Fire Exit Drill

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Operation E-D-I-T-H

"OPERATION E-D-I-T-H" means "Exit Drill in the House." It is a Family Plan for Fire Safety. Exit Drills train families in orderly escape from fire and the purpose of an Exit Drill in the Home is to learn by doing. It is important for Families to plan and practice methods of evacuation in case of an emergency, making sure there are two means of escape from each room. Develop habit patterns Now to ensure Family Safety! A few U.S. fire experiences in 2000 and 2001 will help stress the importance of Exit

Drills in the Home

  • Public fire departments responded to 1,708,000 fires in 2000.
  • There were 505,000 structure fires in 2000.
  • 75.1% of all structure fires, or 379,500 fires, occurred in residential properties, and 283,500 of these residential fires occurred in one and two-family homes, accounting for 56.1% of all structure fires. 16.7% or 84,500 fires were in apartments.
  •  37 Catastrophic fires killed 2,975 people in the U.S. in 2001.
  • There were 4,045 civilian fire deaths in 2000. Home fires accounted for 3,445 of those fire deaths.
  • More people must use and maintain Smoke Detectors, and they must develop and rehearse home escape plans.
  • Fire Drills are required in schools, hospitals, and some places of employment, but they are neglected in the American Home.
  • Exit Drills reduce chances of panic, injury, or death in case of fires or other disasters, and trained informed people have a much better chance to survive these situations.
  • Source: September / October 2001 and 2002 NFPA Journals.
  • There were 4,045 civilian fire deaths in 2000. Home fires accounted for 3,445 of those fire deaths.
  • More people must use and maintain Smoke Detectors, and they must develop and rehearse home escape plans.
  • Fire Drills are required in schools, hospitals, and some places of employment, but they are neglected in the American Home.
  • Exit Drills reduce chances of panic, injury, or death in case of fires or other disasters, and trained informed people have a much better chance to survive these situations.
  • Source: September / October 2001 and 2002 NFPA Journals